You’re in a new country sitting down for your first meal or riding in your first taxi and you start to wonder to yourself what the tipping structure is like at your destination.

Tipping Etiquette Around the World
Tipping Etiquette Around the World

In some countries it may be considered rude or even offensive to tip whereas in another country it could very well be the opposite. How do you know which one is the correct etiquette for your destination? Your UNIGLOBE experts are here to guide you through the tipping etiquettes for around the world.

North America
It is customary and expected to tip in both Canada and the United States.

  • Restaurants: Tips range from 15% to 20% as long as there are no service charges already added.
  • Hotels: Tip porters $1 - $2 per bag and housekeepers about $2 - $5 per day depending on the rating of the hotel.
  • Taxis: Drivers get tipped about 10% - 15% of your total bill.

South America

  • Restaurants: When there are no service charges already added then it’s a 10% tip.
  • Hotels: Tip porters about $1 per bag and housekeeping staff around $2 per day. Exceptions apply when staying at luxury hotels.
  • Taxis: Not required to tip taxi drivers though you could always round up the bill.

Europe
Leave tips using cash instead of credit cards when dining out or otherwise your server may not receive it.

  • Restaurants: When there are no service charges already added then it’s ideal to leave a 5% to 10% tip, though it’s more of a gesture on your part rather than an unwritten rule for tipping.
  • Hotels: Tip porters €1 - €2 per bag and housekeeping staff around €1- €2 per day.
  • Taxis: Tipping is not required, just round up the fair and leave the change.

Asia

  • Restaurants: It can be seen as rude to leave a tip in Japan and China though a 10% tip is more common in Hong Kong as long as no service fees have already been added.
  • Hotels: If you are staying in a high end hotel then there will be a 10%-20% compulsory service fee already added onto your bill, otherwise tip around 10 yuan to the porter per bag.
  • Taxi: No tipping is required at all in Japan and China but round up the fair and leave the change for the rest of the continent.

Southeast Asia

  • Restaurants: Tipping isn’t required but it’s recommended to leave a 5% - 10% tip as long as no service fees have already been added.
  • Hotels: Tip porters around $1 per bag and no requirement to leave anything for the housekeeping staff though that is up to your own discretion.
  • Taxis: Tipping is not required, just round up the fair and leave the change.

Australia and New Zealand

  • Restaurants: Tipping is not expected in New Zealand but in Australia the norm is to tip 10% in a high end restaurant.
  • Hotels: Tip porters $1 - $2 per bag and housekeeping staff $1 - $5 per day depending on how much of a mess you make.
  • Taxi: Tipping is not required in Australia, just round up the fair and leave the change. In New Zealand it’s customary to leave a 10% tip on  top of your total bill.

Middle East

  • Restaurants: A service charge is generally added to your bill but if it’s not then a 10% tip will suffice.
  • Hotels: Tip porters $1 - $2 per bag and housekeepers about $1 - $2 per day.
  • Taxi: Tipping is not expected nor required.

Africa

  • Restaurants: Tip 5% - 10% when no service charge has been added and when in South Africa tip an additional 5%.
  • Hotels: Tip porters $1 and if you want additional services tip the concierge in advance. They may be able to help you get tickets to special events or attractions.
  • Taxi: Drivers get tipped about 10% of your total bill

Not all countries will accept American Dollars so always be prepared with the destination currency. Always use your own discretion when tipping and remember to double check if the country you’re going to does not accept tips. Enjoy your travels and take the worry out of when and where to tip with this tipping etiquette guide.

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